F.A.Q.'s and Methods

Acupuncture Treatment

Auriculotherapy
Moxibustion
Gua Sha
Massage/Bodywork
Cupping
Electric Stimulation
Auriculotherapy

Auriculotherapy, also known as Auricular or ear Acupuncture, is a form of acupuncture that is performed entirely on the ear. Known as a microsystem, the outer ear contains about 200 acupuncture points that directly correlate to various parts of the body and as direct triggers to the brain. Auriculotherapy can be used alone as a primary mode of treatment or in conjunction with other treatments.

Moxibustion

Moxibustion is a type of stimulation of acupoints using an herb called moxa (also known as mugwort). This herb, in a cone form, is placed directly onto the skin and then lit so that it burns directly onto the skin, about 2/3’s down. The heat that is emitted penetrates the acupoint to move Qi and blood throughout the meridians and muscles. Moxibustion is used in conjunction with acupuncture to treat more advanced disease or acute imbalances. According to MRI scans, when moxa is burnt onto the skin, there is an increase of white blood cells. Moxa can also be burned indirectly off of the skin. For example, a piece of moxa can be placed on top of a needle or it can be used an inch away from the skin in the form of pole moxa, which looks like a cigar.

Gua Sha

The Mandarin word “Gua Sha” literally translates as “scraping sand.” The Gua Sha technique utilizes a thin, flat board with rounded edges, a water buffalo horn or a porcelain soup-spoon that is then pushed along the surface of the epidermis. This technique draws any build-up of toxins up to the surface of the body and promotes the flow of lymph and nutrients.

As the toxins are brought up to the skin, small pools of blood called petechiae, appear below its surface. If the blood has a deep purple hue, it means it is old and stagnant and indicates that ischemia is prevalent in the area. If the blood is dark-green, it is a positive sign that stagnant blood and toxins are being released. Gua Sha’s goal is to break surface capillaries so that they can rebuild themselves with a fresh supply of blood along with oxygenated, nutrient-rich fluids that regenerate and revitalize the regions where the treatment has been applied. This process can also help avert the potential growth of cancerous cells. Petechiae and bruising that arise from this treatment can last up to four to five days. Gua Sha is used best for stiffness and pain along the muscles and softens any indurations. Frozen shoulder, insomnia, asthma, allergies, menstrual disorders, and degenerative illnesses can also be treated with Gua Sha.

Massage/Bodywork

We utilize the Zheng Gu Tui Na method of massage. It combines Eastern medical principles, acupressure and an Oriental style of muscle, fascia and tissue manipulation.  It is used for a wide variety of musculoskeletal conditions when used with acupuncture, external herbal liniments, or a combination of three modalities.

In addition to Tui Na, we also offer Korean Chuna therapy.  Unlike tui na, Chuna therapy is used realign the musculoskeletal structures as well as releasing myofascial constraints.

Cupping

Cupping is a technique where a heat vacuum is created along the skin with the use of glass jars. This process increases blood and cell circulation through the skin and removes any stagnation around connective tissues and muscle. Cupping is applied to the upper, middle, and lower parts of the back, shoulders and legs, anywhere there is swelling and pain. It is also used in digestive conditions such as diarrhea and vomiting and is also effective to treat respiratory conditions such as the flu, asthma, chronic cough and shortness of breath.

*It was also used by athletes such as Michael Phelps and Alex Naddour in the 2016 Summer Olympics.

Electric Stimulation

As the name suggests, electro-stimulation is a technique where acupoints are treated with a mild electrical current through the acupuncture needles. Electro-stimulation is known to be effective for the following conditions:



  • Pain management: arthritis, bursitis, sciatica, and spasms.
  • Improving muscle tone: CVA, nerve injury or other neurological deficits.
  • Regulation of physiological functions: poor circulation, edema, and metabolic deficiencies.
  • Increasing the production of analgesia for operative intervention.
  • Treatment of addictions.